Coal in Victorian Britain

It is almost impossible to exaggerate the rolethat the coal industry played in nineteenth- andearly twentieth-century Britain. Coal, along with cotton, was the driving force of the Britishindustrial revolution. By the time the First World War broke out in 1914, nearly two-thirds of all thecoal entering world trade was mined in Britain,and coal mining accounted for one in ten of GreatBritain’s male population in employment. The rapidexpansion of coal mining had a profound impactnot just upon the British economy but upon thesocial, cultural, religious, industrial and politicallife of the country.This six-volume, reset collection provides scholars with a wide variety of sources relating to the Victorian coal industry. It is no longer possible to view the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century industry in terms of an unchanging confrontation between owners and miners locked together inan incessant stream of strikes and lockouts. Thecollection takes into account recent developmentsin the historiography of coal mining, showingthat miners and their families did not live bleakly narrow lives in featureless, single-industry communities cut off from the rest of society.Coal is an essential topic for those concerned with the causes, course and consequences of industrialization and de-industrialization. Sourcesincluded in this edition are rare and have been
selected so as to re?ect both the diversity and change taking place within the coal industry, thecommunities which serviced it and the industrialrelations practices which emerged to regulate it. Continue reading ..
Coal in Victorian Britain

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